Making a mark

After waking up late again and promising ourself to set an alarm tomorrow morning, we had a quick bite to eat and then headed to the bus to reach East Vancouver’s Commercial Drive.

A mixed residential-commercial area with a high proportion of ethnic and vegetarian restaurants as well as being home to Vancouver’s ‘Little Italy’ it makes it the perfect place to discover some used books or latest indie trend while also grabbing some seriously tasty lunch. Walking up & down the drive taking in the different array of cultures that surrounded us, from the hippie like culture, indie looking shops and plentiful of hipster inspired coffee bars. There truly is a place for everyone on this East Vancouver street.

Coming back away from the Drive we headed towards West 4th where I had a tattoo appointment scheduled for 4:30pm. With being noticeably nervous waiting, Filip did a great job of calming my nerves while also answering all of my “what if this happens…?” inspired questions. Taking my place on the bench now feeling more at ease the whole process was over in just half an hour in what felt like just a pro-longed routine blood test, something of which I am overly used to. Now with my mountains etched on my arm for life we headed into downtown to grab some dinner before watching ‘Café Society’ at the nearby Cineplex Odeon.


‘Tacofino’ in Gastown is probably home of the best Burrito I have ever had the privilege of consuming. Naturally the setting of Gastown also improves the senses visually even more, creating the ultimate TacoFino experience. It was just a really good burrito, okay. As for ‘Café Society’, directed by Woody Allen and set in the late 1930s telling the love story of a young Bronx native moving to Hollywood before returning to New York finding much more success. For me the film at times felt a little bit predictable and the acting of Steve Carrel and Jesse Eisenberg  respectably being a little blunt with not much energy put into their roles. With that being said I would recommend the movie to anyone wanting to see a modern 1930s set classic that is both at times charming and funny.


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